22-N by Roger

John, Michelle, Cass, Denny

N is for NAMECHECK

noun
1. a public mention or listing of the name of a person or thing such as a product, especially in acknowledgment or for publicity purposes.

verb
1. publicly mention or list the name of.
“He NAMECHECKS a legion of producers and DJs”

There are a LOT of songs out there, as noted here, that NAMECHECK other artists, or themselves.

The Beatles’ Glass Onion, from the white album, is quite self-referential in its NAMECHECKS. It mentions song titles by the group such as Strawberry Fields Forever (“You know the place where nothing is real”), I Am the Walrus (“I told you about the walrus and me… The walrus was Paul”), Lady Madonna (“… trying to make ends meet, yeah”), Fool on the Hill (“I told you about the…”) and Fixing a Hole (“…in the ocean”)

But no one did it more thoroughly than the Mamas and the Papas in Creeque Alley.

John and Mitchie were gettin’ kind of itchy
Just to leave the folk music behind
[Papa John Phillips, Mama Michelle Gilliam Phillips]

Zal and Denny workin’ for a penny
Tryin’ to get a fish on the line
[Zal Yanovsky of the Lovin’ Spoonful, Papa Denny Doherty]

In a coffee house, Sebastian sat
And after every number, they’d pass the hat
[John Sebastian of the Lovin’ Spoonful]

McGuinn and McGuire just a-gettin’ higher in L.A
You know where that’s at…
[Roger McGuinn of the Byrds, Barry McGuire of The New Christy Minstrels]

When Cass was a sophomore, planned to go to Swarthmore
But she changed her mind one day
[Mama Cass Elliot]

and at the end

And California dreamin’ is becomin’ a reality [California Dreamin’, their first big hit]

Listen to Creeque Alley, which went to #5 on the US Billboard charts in 1967.

Then go visit Photo Cache, Indrani, Jaipur Garden, Crafty Gardener, Shooting Parrots, Island Rambles, You and I-Uppal, Jesh StG, Ann Chin, Su-sieee! Mac, photodoug, Nix Pix Mix, A ShutterBug Explores, My Desktop Daily, Kołobrzeg County Photo, Objectif Regarder, Lea’s Menagerie, Helaq, Lady in Read Writes, Day One Photography, Tin and Sparkle, Coloring Outside the Lines, Not Afraid of Color, Gattina, Anita Explorer, Phenomenal World, and, well, anyone I might have missed.

Oh, yeah, how could I forget Melody Music? You could even visit Ramblin’ with Roger, if you had a mind to. (And if that isn’t a gnarly NAMECHECK, I don’t know what is…)

 

 

N is for NO

It occurred to me that, in many languages, especialy the Indo-European ones, the word for NO starts with the letter N. From here:

BENGALI, KURDISH, PERSIAN (FARSI), ROMANI, SINDHI – na
SINHALESE – nae
WELSH – nage
URDU – nahin
GUARANI – nahániri
HINDI – nahin
BRETON – nann
GALLO – nanni
PORTUGUESE – não
BOSNIAN, CROATIAN, CZECH, ESPERANTO, LITHUANIAN, MACEDONIAN, SERBIAN, SLOVENE, SOBOTA – ne
BULGARIAN –
LATVIAN –
AFRIKAANS, DUTCH, FRISIAN, LOW SAXON – nee
LUXEMBOURGISH – neen
FAROESE, ICELANDIC, NORWEGIAN, OLD NORSE – nei
GERMAN, YIDDISH – nein
DANISH, SWEDISH – nej
HUNGARIAN – nem
WALLOON – neni
NORMANnennin / nenn
UKRAINIAN – ni
BELARUSSIAN, POLISH, SLOVAK – nie
RUSSIAN – niet
CATALAN, ENGLISH, FRIULAN, ITALIAN, KURDISH, LIGURIAN, PAPIAMENTO, SARDINIAN, SPANISH – no
CORSICAN –
FRENCH, GALICIAN, HAITIAN CREOLE, OCCITAN –non
ROMANIAN – nu

Y’know, it’s not always bad saying NO. Often the question you are asked is, “Can you do X?” And you think, “Yes, I CAN do X. But OUGHT I to do X?”

So the REAL question should be, “WILL you do X?” And, for reasons of sanity, sometimes the answer should be a resounding NO.

Incidentally, there appears to be some disagreement over what function NO performs in the following sentence: “No, you are mistaken.”

Some sources claim it is an interjection, while others suggest it is an adverb. A Wikipedia article seemingly disagrees with both options.