24-J by Roger

I was telling Melody that I didn’t think I’d have time to JOT down an introduction for the J. “My life has been such a JUMBLE lately. I still am doing Black History Month stuff at church. I have to JABBER about demographic information without using too much JARGON at the Chamber of Commerce.”

Melody advised me that she has confidence in me. “JEEZE! But I’ve run out of JUICE. I’ve been to five funerals in this calendar year already this year. And it it’s too cold to JOG.

“Moreover, I have to JUGGLE a trip to New York City, work on a Book and Author event, prepare a webinar on sales tax for my JOB, though I am JAZZED about it. I’m looking for something to JETTISON.”

Maybe next time I can JAW about something.

 

24-G by Roger

Its-not-easy-bein-green-w-KermitHaving been Green my whole life, I know the wisdom of the song first sung by the great philosopher Kermit the Frog.

It’s not that easy bein’ green
Having to spend each day the
color of the leaves
When I think it could be nicer
bein’ red or yellow or gold
Or something much more colorful like that

“Bein’ Green” was written by Joe Raposo and was originally performed by Jim Henson as Kermit on both Sesame Street and The Muppet Show.

It’s not easy bein’ green
It seems you blend in with so
many other ordinary things
And people tend to pass you over ’cause you’re
Not standin’ out like flashy
sparkles on the water
Or stars in the sky

It has been covered by a number of performers such as Ray Charles. Van Morrison, and Frank Sinatra.

But green is the color of Spring
And green can be cool and friendly-like
And green can be big like an ocean
Or important like a mountain
Or tall like a tree

“Bein’ Green” was sung by Big Bird (Caroll Spinney) at the two memorial services for Jim Henson in 1990.

When green is all there is to be
It could make you wonder why
But why wonder, why wonder?
I am green and it’ll do fine
It’s beautiful
And I think it’s what I want to be

 

 

24-D by Roger

D is for doors and my late dad.

painting
Back in May of 2014, I participated in this ninety-minute writing class from a woman named Diane Cameron. Among many other things, she’s a freelance writer who appears in the local newspaper regularly.

The directive was to think of three doors that were important in your life. Then you write about one of them for four minutes. And by “writing,” this means not taking the pen off the paper, not editing, just letting the words take us where they would.

The first door was the outside door Continue reading