23-F by Roger

This is a peony. At least I THINK it is.

Here’s a true confession: I am astonishingly LOUSY at identifying the various types of flowers out there.

Oh, there are a few I recognize: some lilies, tulips, roses, carnations, sunflowers, probably a few more. But I’ve seen begonias, hydrangea, peonies, and many more, but the next time, it’ll be “What’s that one again?”

Still, the collective wisdom of the participants of ABC Wednesday has done a stellar job at introducing me to a number of beautiful and unusual flora. Unfortunately, this brain loses the connection between the name and the picture. It used to be frustrating, but now it just IS.

So please keep posting those stunning flower pictures for ABC Wednesday. Your compatriots will appreciate it, as WILL I, even if I forget the flower names in both Latin AND English.

 

 

23-C by Roger

The combination of colors make other colors. On the ROY G BIV scale, red and yellow make orange, yellow and blue make green, and blue and red make indigo and violet.

But in mixing of pigments or dyes for printing, the primaries normally used are cyan, magenta, and yellow. And for additive combination of colors, as in overlapping projected lights or in CRT displays, the primary colors normally used are red, green, and blue.

In any case, here are some color songs, with links I HOPE work in your country:

Fancy Colours – Chicago

Red Rubber Ball – the Cyrkle
Orange Crush – REM
Mellow Yellow – Donovan
Green Tambourine – Lemon Pipers
Blue Bayou – Roy Orbison
Mood Indigo- Ella Fitzgerald
Purple Haze – Jimi Hendrix Experience

Brown-Eyed Girl – Van Morrison
Whiter Shade of Pale – Procol Harum
Black is Black – Los Bravos
Touch of Grey – Grateful Dead

 

 

22-X by Roger

If you’ve been exposed to ABC Wednesday for an extended period, you know we make exceptions from the explicit, exacting requirement to have your topic start with X.

We’ll accept words starting with ex as an acceptable exhortation, or objects looking like the letter X, as well as X-ray or xylophone.

After several rounds, you may have exhausted your vocabulary. It’s no exaggeration that it has become extraordinarily difficult to find enough X words, so we’ve expanded the definition.

As long as we can extrapolate some extra meaning related to X, we won’t excommunicate you from the excitement.

Excelsior!