22-D by Beverly

bcwednesday22 (1)

 

This week at ABC Wednesday, D is the letter of focus.

D is for Dance.

Continuing with my “More” series, focusing on what I want to have more in my life, DANCE  is definitely something I want to do more of. In my twenties, my exercise of choice was dance – I would put on a tape I made and just dance, for 30 or 40 minutes each night. (It was certainly a great way to lose weight!)

There are so many great dance songs – many by lady Gaga and the BeeGees. How freeing it is to just feel the music and dance.

I had to give it up a few years ago when arthritis made it painful to dance. But I have decided I need to start again, with baby steps, to recapture the joy of dancing.

Here are the art cards I created to remind to just dance.

dance 1 001

 

dance 2 001

 

Join in the fun of this weekly challenge. It is never too late to join!

 

 

22-C by Melody

Hi Everybody

End Round 22 is on its way, this week we are at the third letter; the C.

Visiting some friends and whilst admiring their garden, I saw their pond.

For 22-C, I’ve found this one:


 

Have a splendid, ♥-warming ABC-day / – week!
♫ M e l ☺ d y ♫
 

22-B by Roger

The fanous Harry Benson photo taken after the news that they had a #1 single in the USA

I saw this question on Quora recently: “Why are the Beatles so famous even though their songs sound boring?” Seriously.

I certainly can appreciate people having different tastes in music. So if someone thought the songs from a given early album was boring, one could say that, though I wouldn’t. But by the time they got to Rubber Soul and Revolver, I’m not hearing it.

Take the single Eleanor Rigby and Yellow Submarine from the Revolver album. One could barely tell the songs are from the same band.

More sharply, listen to I Want To Hold Your Hand, released on Boxing Day 1963 in the US – though the US doesn’t celebrate the holiday – which truly started Beatlemania in America. Compare it with the single culled from the Sgt. Pepper sessions, Penny Lane and Strawberry Fields Forever, released on February 17, 1967. What a stunning evolution in a little over three years.

On another note, congratulations to Sir Richard Starkey on being knighted.